IO

History

This owl was delivered to Animal Ark on January 25, 2017 from a wildlife rehabilitation organization in northern California. At 3-4 weeks old the owl was found on the ground by people in the area who began to take care of it. It is not known what was fed or exactly how long the bird spent in contact with humans. Eventually the owl was given to the above wildlife rehabilitation group but the bird had already become imprinted on humans through hand feeding and handling. Once at the rehab facility an attempt was made to re-wild the bird by placing it with a surrogate great horned owl female and other owlets. The owl still continued to call out to humans when it would see them. At full growth a final attempt was made to see if a return to the wild was possible through a soft release from the site where the owl was housed. After hanging around for a while and then enjoying the company of neighbors the owl was finally coaxed back into an enclosure and deemed non-releasable. Shortly thereafter Animal Ark was contacted. While waiting for permits to be granted, weather to clear and the Interstate 80 pass to stay open, a rehabilitation volunteer worked with the owl which made the transition to the Ark as smooth as possible. If you have not already guessed I. O. is an abbreviation for Imprint Owl!

Foreste
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Foreste

Foreste

History

Animal Ark was contacted by a local falconer who is a friend and supporter of our wildlife sanctuary. One of his older birds was in need of a new home. A nice enclosure in an educational environment was an ideal location. In August of 2016 permission was granted for Foreste to become a resident of Animal Ark through a permit process under the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Foreste is a pleasure to work with as he likes people and is easy to handle during our educational talks. The gyrfalcon is not often seen in bird of prey exhibits at public facilities so we welcome the opportunity to share with our guests the hunting abilities and general biology of this species.

Ivan

History

Animal Ark learned that there was a turkey vulture in a rehabilitation facility that could be euthanized if deemed non-releasable.  The original causes of the vulture’s injuries are still unknown.  After a biologist associated with the rehabilitation facility tried to release the vulture with no success, a permanent home was prepared at Animal Ark.  Ivan arrived at Animal Ark on Saturday, July 7, 2012.

The scientific name of the turkey vulture (cathartes) comes from the Greek word kathartes which means a cleanser or purifier and refers to the scavenging nature of the bird.  The turkey vulture feeds almost entirely on carrion, and is one of the few birds of prey that uses its sense of smell to locate food.  Turkey vultures have an elevated hind toe for walking, cool their body by urinating on their legs, and do not possess a voice box so they are nearly silent, except for hisses and grunts.  Some scientists believe that these vultures are more closely related to storks than hawks and eagles.

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Cordelia

Cordelia

History

Cordelia was found in a park with an injured elbow. Because of this injury she could no longer fly and therefore could not be released back into the wild. The rehabilitation facility which housed and treated this bird did not want to euthanize her because she was so tractable. Animal Ark was contacted and after several months of working toward obtaining a permit for raptors, everything was finally in order. The owl arrived August 1, 1990. As the first bird of prey species at the Animal Ark, Cordelia challenged the staff to create an enclosure that would meet her special needs. Your tour of the Ark will show you there are now several species of raptors.


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